Usually not all of the larvae pupate immediately, but may remain in the cocoon for one to three years. The older larva of the black headed pine sawfly is about one-inch long with an olive green body and a glossy black head. Alabama Forestry Commission The summer feeding sawflies are present from spring until the first hard freeze. Present: April to July, WARREN’S SAWFLY (Neodiprion warreni) Markings: shiny black head, broad black subdorsal, lateral, and sublateral stripes Control - Outbreaks of the blackheaded pine sawfly occur periodically and usually subside rapidly. In the fall, however, defoliation may exceed 90 percent of the total crown and result in a considerable growth reduction during the following season. Pupation is completed in the spring, and both adults and larvae are sometimes present throughout the summer and fall. VIRGINIA PINE SAWFLY (Neodiprion pratti pratti) Markings: black head, body spotted or marked with longitudinal black stripes Hosts: Virginia and shortleaf pines Present: Spring to July . There are 3 to 4 generations per year in the Gulf coastal region If populations are not reduced by the second year, insecticides may be necessary. Physical Address Present: Spring to July, VIRGINIA PINE SAWFLY (Neodiprion pratti pratti) Markings: black head, body spotted or marked with longitudinal black stripes Individual slits are cut for each egg with a saw-like ovipositor and from 10 to 30 eggs are laid in eaneedle. Hosts: loblolly, slash, pitch, shortleaf, and longleaf pines (eastern white pine and deodar cedar) Reddish straw-like remains of needles indicate feeding by young larvae. (334) 240-9300, Mailing Address Present: Spring to mid-June. Insecticides may be warranted on high value trees. 98 pp. Present: Spring to heavy frost, ABBOTT’S SAWFLY (Neodiprion abbottii) Markings: brown to black head, thorax and abdomen pale green, four dark green to black lateral stripes State Headquarters: Larvae feed on the needles and mature in 3 to 6 weeks. It prefers white pine but also feeds on Scotch, red, Jack, and mugo pines. Most of the larvae are about 1 inch in length and resemble caterpillars. The resulting loss in vigor may predispose slow-growing pines to bark beetle attack. 513 Madison Ave. Introduced Pine Sawfly (Diprion similis): This species was introduced from Europe in 1914 and is now present throughout the northeast. Different species of sawflies feed on different plants. Diprion pini, often referred to as the Common Sawfly or Conifer Sawfly, is a pest of pine trees throughout much of Europe. The blackheaded pine sawfly larvae are about one-inch long, light greenish in color with four distinct stripes along the top and a shiny black head. Hosts: eastern white pine (Virginia and shortleaf pines) Outbreaks of the blackheaded pine sawfly occur periodically and usually subside rapidly. Even though hundreds of acres of pines may be defoliated one year, very few larvae or defoliated trees are observed the next because of natural controls, e.g., weather, predators, parasites, and disease organisms. PO Box 302550 The larvae overwinter in light brown cocoons spun principally in duff, topsoil, and bark crevices at the base of the trees. Present: Spring to July, WHITE PINE SAWFLY (Neodiprion pinetum) Markings: black head, pale yellow with 4 rows of black spots extending from head to a black spot at tail end of body Cocooning also occurs on needles, limbs and trunk of the tree, particularly if the ground is flooded. Hosts: spruce and shortleaf pines Defoliation during spring and summer is not serious because larvae tend to feed on the older foliage. When mature, redheaded pine sawfly larvae are about one-inch long, yellowish-green with six rows of conspicuous black spots and a red head. The adult female is about 1/2 inch (12 mm) long with a light brown body. When mature, redheaded pine sawfly larvae are about one-inch long, yellowish-green with six rows of conspicuous black spots and a red head. The introduced pine sawfly (Diprion similis) larva is about an inch in length, yellowish green with two black stripes down the back with mottled sides, and a black head. The spring sawflies are present in early spring and may be found feeding into the summer. Identification: Adults are small heavy-bodied four-winged "flies” seldom observed. Host: Slash, longleaf, loblolly, Virginia and occasionally other pines. Older larvae are about 1 inch (25 mm) long and olive green with a glossy black head. Protrotection Report R8-PR16. Photo credit: Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Archives, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; Gerald J. Lenhard, Louisiana State University, ForestryImages.Org, Report a Wildfire: 1 (800) 392-5679 Present: Spring to July, SLASH PINE SAWFLY (Neodiprion merkeli) Markings: reddish above the eyes and sooty black below the eyes, brown stripes and two widely separated black semi-oval spots near tail end