Di Justo: At the very beginning, in the miniseries, where Commander Adama says that the radiation on Ragnar is affecting the Cylon's silica pathways to the brain: For myself, I was thinking of dark silicon, like the stuff a CPU is made out of. So we thought, hey, no one's really building up the science in the show, and it's there. Di Justo: Yes. That sounds really cool, but when you start to look into it, we, the people on the planet Earth in 2010, we are not immune to lymphocytic encephalitis. So it's not that they did something that was completely against physics or biology. It's just that there would be times when they wouldn't mention or play up the science. Instead of dark silica, like a CPU, what is more likely is that they have fiber optics jacking up their neural systems. Di Justo: Just a couple of months ago, Craig Venter announced that he had basically created a genome and created living cells out of a manufactured genome. Di Justo: Think about what the mood in this country was like in 2003. WIRED is where tomorrow is realized. So probably yes. Wired.com: The theme of resurrection is interesting, though, because the Cylons are the only other ones who can come back from death. Can you talk a bit about that? And what the frak was up with the mitochondrial Eve thing? ", "Frak" is used in the same sense as in Battlestar by characters in the early 21st century "Ciaphas Cain" series of Games Workshop Warhammer 40,000 novels by Sandy Mitchell.[3]. All rights reserved. The breakthroughs and innovations that we uncover lead to new ways of thinking, new connections, and new industries. Di Justo: Right. It takes us away from our current day, so that we can turn around and look at ourselves through a different lens. Further, language still qualifies for changes to the TV viewer rating for the show (Battlestar normally gets a TV-14 rating, but has had times where a TV-M rating might have been used for adult content). That's the only official mistake. The term, as a pejorative, can be used to curse someone you vilify or find disgusting: The term can be used in several variations and compound words: The term also is used as an adjective to describe an action or object that is subjectively considered outrageous, extreme, or ill-advised. We do not own any of the television shows, movies or film clips contained in this archive, merely provide you - the visitor - with screencaps for use and enjoyment. frak-that.com > a battlestar galactica dvd screencap archive (part of cap-that.com) Direct linking is allowed. When D'Anna was doing her documentary, they had portable TV cameras that looked just like ours, and cell phones that looked just like ours. I very much think the final montage in the final episode was a comment to ourselves, saying hey, keep an eye on what you're building. Wired.com: So if we're descended from this more advanced civilization, what happened to all the technology? Radiological alarm!" If they're not helped soon, they're all going to die. And of course, what's an angel? To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories. $26.99. Follow us on Twitter @astrolisa and @wiredscience, and on Facebook. Its subversive value, exploited far more extensively in the Re-imagined Series, is that it sounds like a variant of "fuck", and in the latter series it actually conveys that meaning. Wired.com: What about Cylon neural structure? The whole story, the events of the TV show Battlestar Galactica, all took place approximately 150,000 years ago. So you can almost argue why not just shoot it into the sun and get us off the technology kick a little earlier. They're talking about, look at all the things that happen when you build robots. Free shipping. There's also one tiny thing to point out: In the final episode, we saw Angel Baltar and Angel Six reading National Geographic over Ron Moore's shoulder about mitochondrial Eve, and everyone just assumed that we're talking about little baby Hera. Di Justo: [Laughs] To the best of my knowledge, no. The iGEM competitions are manufacturing biological creatures using standardized parts, much like Legos or electronic components. The big difference was that they had developed practical interplanetary spaceflight. How can a humanoid robot plug directly into a spaceship? It continues to be used throughout different versions of the Battlestar Galactica franchise as a profanity in science fiction. Wired.com: What kind of messages or cautionary tales do we get from the treatment of these questions in Battlestar? The WIRED conversation illuminates how technology is changing every aspect of our lives—from culture to business, science to design. Di Justo: No, not wrong. And then he gets this little smug look on his face. Together with the show's science advisor, NASA scientist Kevin Grazier, Di Justo jumps beyond the red line to delve into the science behind the story -- and discovers that some things lie beyond what science can reach. Read a Wired.com exclusive excerpt from the new book by Patrick Di […]. "Frak" is a fictional censored version of "fuck" first used in the 1978 Battlestar Galactica series (with the spelling "frack"). $26.99. Di Justo: They shot it into the sun, remember? They never explain how it happens, it's just spin up the drives and whoosh -- off you go. DiJusto: Very basically, how could Cylons pass medical tests? Frak or frack is a fictional version of "fuck" first used in the 1978 Battlestar Galactica television series. Ad Choices, What the Frak? Di Justo: Right, but the question is, did she come back bodily? adidas Badge of Sport Tee Women's. As long as you could reasonably say, okay, let's FTL jump out of here, that's all you needed to know -- until an aspect of the drama required you need to know how it works. Wired.com: So it's not necessarily Sharon and Helo's baby. Wired.com: Is there anything that is still left as a mystery? They're sickened, they're on the verge of death. People I was talking to about the show had differences of opinion about whether that was a good idea. Who knows? Read a Wired.com exclusive excerpt from the new book by Patrick Di Justo and Kevin Grazier, *The Science of Battlestar Galactica.*. - Alex Quartararo (. "You know what? Di Justo: That's what we're seeing, yeah. Free shipping . was the title of a game released on the BBC Micro B and Acorn Electron in 1984, and later the Commodore 64. Doctor Cottle explains that the Colonials are immune to this disease. [1] It occurs as an expletive and in expressions such as "fraks things up good" and "frakking toasters"[2], "Frak!" Di Justo: There's actually a quote in the book, where it says, "Drama wins every time." Anyway, still looking for video online of said video montage, but have had a Wired.com: People have raised parallels between Battlestar Galactica and our own world, and not just in the way the final episode plays out. But it's my understanding that, she died, and was resurrected. Patrick Di Justo: Battlestar Galactica has been called "a science fiction show without the science." The term can be used as a means of conveying shock or surprise: "Oh, frak me! The whole story, the events of the TV show Battlestar Galactica, all took place approximately 150,000 years ago. Lisa is a Wired Science contributor based loosely in Seattle, Washington. They're called BioBricks because they're supposed to be like Legos: You snap them together and build what you want. [Editor's note: In a press conference at the Science Fiction Museum in Seattle, executive producer Ronald Moore said that this story was a myth. Then this show came along, which paralleled or mirrored that. There are two main ways to spell the term, but "frack" is how it appears in the Writer's Guide, dated October, 2, 1978. I would say that they're beyond what the act of science can explain. The term, as a pejorative, can be used to curse someone you vilify or find disgusting: The term can be used in several variations and compound words: The term also is used as an adjective to describe an action or object that is subjectively considered outrageous, extreme, or ill-advised. It takes us to the future, out in space. But Baltar says in that last scene that mitochondrial Eve had a human father and Cylon mother. And the show never explains how that works, how that happens -- it just happens. $12.99. In the "re-imagined" version, and subsequently in Caprica, it appears with greater frequency and with the revised spelling "frak", as the producers wanted to make it a four-letter word. It occurs as an expletive and in expressions such as "fraks things up good" and "frakking toasters" For the first nine episodes of Galactica 1980 , the term " felgercarb " is used in lieu of "frack", likely because of the "Kiddie Hour" timeslot 1980 held at the time. This page was last edited on 7 September 2020, at 09:51. We always knew that. Feel free to use these buttons to link to our site. Sometimes if we're not careful, we die. I don't know. Popular . When these things wore out, probably within the lifetime of the first Colonial generation, they were going to be gone forever. [ frak-that.com ] your BATTLESTAR GALATICA screencaps source, providing you with DVD screencaps from the tv and mini series. The game saw the user controlling a caveman called Trogg, who had to navigate maze-like scenarios and dispose of deadly obstacles; when coming into contact with such an obstacle or falling a substantial distance, Trogg would cry "Frak!