Waterhouse was inspired by Homer’s Odyssey to paint several other masterpieces, one of which is Circe” Offering the Cup to Ulysses. Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. The picture is clearly related to The Sorceress, an unfinished canvas by Waterhouse of circa 1911, which would itself more suitably be called Circe since it is inscribed with this title on the back and includes two animals, the victims of Circe's charms, at the left (see Anthony Hobson, The Art and… Circe” was a beautiful sorceress who turned mortals into animals by giving them a wine filled with an evil potion. Under her feet, Scylla's "barking shapes" already swirl in the bubbling depths below; the transformation is well underway. the magic chant that issues from her lips. (922 × 614 pixels, file size: 109 KB, MIME type: https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/. around her hips, the horrid barking shapes.[2]. Then Scylla comes; no sooner has she plunged Circe Offering the Cup to Ulysses is an oil painting in the Pre-Raphaelite style by John William Waterhouse that was created in 1891. He went to Circe”, who had him drink the potion to turn him into a pig as well, when it did not work Ulysses drew his sword and threatened Circe” who, in disbelief, begged him to forgive her.Waterhouse portrays Circe”, cup in one hand, wand in the other, surrounded by purple flowers, the color of royalty, offering the potion to Ulysses. Das Bild "John William Waterhouse Circe Offering the Cup to Odysseus" wird für Sie als Leinwandbild von Hand auf eine echte, 360g schwere Künstlerleinwand gedruckt und auf einen Holz-Keilrahmen aufgezogen. His family moved to England right after his birth. John William Waterhouse was born (baptized) in 1849 in the Eternal City, Rome. Waterhouse was inspired by Homer's Odyssey to paint several other masterpieces, one of which is Circe" Offering the Cup to Ulysses. File:John William Waterhouse - Sketch of Circe, 1911-1914.jpg. 53; 1989, pl. Image released under Creative Commons CC-BY-NC-ND (3.0 Unported). [6], Art Gallery of South Australia: Collection, The Unwelcome Companion: A Street Scene in Cairo, I Am Half-Sick of Shadows, Said the Lady of Shalott, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Circe_Invidiosa&oldid=989702524, Collections of the Art Gallery of South Australia, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 20 November 2020, at 14:49. Waterhouse, 1980, p.128, no. This particular mythological portrayal is based on Ovid's tale in Metamorphoses, wherein Circe turns Scylla into a sea monster, solely because Glaucus scorned the enchantress' romantic advances in hopes of attaining Scylla's love instead. File:John William Waterhouse - Sketch of Circe, 1911-1914.jpg, File:Waterhouse, JW - The Sorceress (1913).jpg, User:Jane023/paintings by John William Waterhouse, Kasutaja:Jane023/paintings by John William Waterhouse, Lista de pinturas de John William Waterhouse, Wikidata:WikiProject sum of all paintings/Creator/John William Waterhouse, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:John_William_Waterhouse_-_Sketch_of_Circe,_1911-1914.jpg&oldid=434247786, Mythological paintings by John William Waterhouse, Paintings of females in profile, facing left, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Height: 73.9 cm (29.1 in); Width: 109.2 cm (43 in). But within its confines are flowers and the woman herself, objects of beauty. Waterhouse, Oxford 1989, pp.37-8, reproduced p.36.Christopher Wood, Victorian Painting, London 1999, pp.236-242. Circe Invidiosa is a painting by John William Waterhouse completed in 1892. More specifically, the notion of woman as enchantress is one that recurs in images such as Circe Offering the Cup to Ulysees (1891, Oldham Art Gallery) and Hylas and the Nymphs (1896, Manchester City Art Gallery). We would like to hear from you. It is his second depiction, after Circe Offering the Cup to Ulysses (1891), of the Greek mythological character, Circe, this time while she is poisoning the water to turn Scylla, Circe's rival for Glaucus, "into a hideous monster". From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository, Add a one-line explanation of what this file represents, date QS:P571,+1911-00-00T00:00:00Z/8,P1319,+1911-00-00T00:00:00Z/9,P1326,+1914-00-00T00:00:00Z/9, medium QS:P186,Q296955;P186,Q12321255,P518,Q861259, dimensions QS:P2048,73.98U174728;P2049,109.22U174728. Learn how and when to remove this template message, The Unwelcome Companion: A Street Scene in Cairo, I Am Half-Sick of Shadows, Said the Lady of Shalott, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Circe_Offering_the_Cup_to_Ulysses&oldid=986033113, Articles lacking sources from August 2020, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 29 October 2020, at 11:47. Miracles, magic and the power of prophecy are common themes in Waterhouse's art. It is his second depiction, after Circe Offering the Cup to Ulysses (1891), of the classical mythological character Circe. From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository. Circe Invidiosa is part of the collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia, which also owns Waterhouse's The Favourites of the Emperor Honorius.[1]. Waterhouse later returned to the subject of Circe a third time with The Sorceress(1… She sits on a golden throne, roaring lions depicted on each arm. reducing shadows to a narrow thread. Circe" was a beautiful sorceress who turned mortals into animals by giving them a wine filled with an evil potion.